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Is the West in too deep in Ukraine? Europe's learned dependence on U.S. power. A short-seller may take down India's richest man. Plus more stories.

Your must-reads on important topics

  1. A Russian mercenary group is exploiting penal colony inmates, sending them to fight in Ukraine in exchange for the promise of freedom. Now, many are returning from the frontlines. The NYT reports.

    Curated by informed
    The New York TimesThe New York Times

    'Very dangerous people': Russia's convict fighters are heading home

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    World Affairs6 min read
  2. Bloomberg columnist Pankaj Mishra offers a take we haven't seen widely published: There's very good reason to worry, he argues, about the "cheerleading" of military intervention among Western elites.

    Curated by informed
    BloombergBloomberg

    The West is getting in too deep in Ukraine

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    World Affairs3 min read
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  4. Two foreign policy analysts make a contrarian argument in FP: The idea that Europe can't defend itself without the U.S. is misguided, and Russia's invasion of Ukraine only underscores this point.

    Curated by informed
    Foreign PolicyForeign Policy

    Europe doesn’t need the United States anymore

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    World Affairs7 min read
  5. A top U.S. general believes open military conflict between the U.S. and China could come in as little as two years. The Washington Post examines whether there's good reason for the dire prediction.

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    The Washington PostThe Washington Post

    Why is a U.S. general predicting war with China by 2025?

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    World Affairs4 min read
  6. On the third anniversary of Brexit, Guardian columnist and longstanding Remainer Polly Toynbee claims there are signs that the U.K. is reuniting against those who campaigned for the U.K. to cut loose.

    Curated by informed
    The GuardianThe Guardian

    Three years on from Brexit, all UK voters are left with is a bitter taste of Bregret

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    World Affairs3 min read
  7. The Economist has the fascinating story of how one small investment firm in New York has accused India's richest man and his massive conglomerate of running the "largest corporate con in history."

    Curated by informed
    The EconomistThe Economist

    A short-seller rattles Gautam Adani’s empire

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    Business4 min read
  8. For an organization ostensibly dedicated to humanity's well-being, there are a lot of questions surrounding how OpenAI, the creator of ChatGPT, conducts business. NZZ investigates.

    Curated by informed
    Neue Zürcher Zeitung

    OpenAI once wanted to save the world. Now it’s chasing profit

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    Tech0 min read

Great reads for different interests

  1. Here's your daily dose of good news ☀️ For the first time ever, renewable energy produced more electricity in Europe than fossil fuels. Euronews reports on the findings.

    Curated by informed
    Euronews

    Wind and solar generated a record 22% of EU electricity in 2022

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    Climate4 min read
  2. The outlook for the global economy is better than many anticipated, the Washington Post reports. That's mainly down to the fact that we've managed to avert an extended energy-related crisis.

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    The Washington PostThe Washington Post

    Prospects for the global economy are improving as worst fears fade

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    Economy5 min read
  3. W.H.O. has noted that COVID-19 pandemic has now reached an inflection point where its status could be downgraded to a less dire, but permanent presence in human pathogens. Ars Technica has the report.

    Curated by informed
    Ars Technica

    Covid is still a global health emergency, but end may be near, WHO says

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    Science3 min read
  4. Wondering where is best to invest in order to tackle climate change? This Bloomberg piece argues that your green investment should go towards removing CO2 from the atmosphere.

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    BloombergBloomberg

    Carbon removal is where green investment should go

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    Climate4 min read
  5. Gyms aren't always the most comfortable places - all the machines, mirrors and grunting can be rather intimidating. The Guardian provides us with 7 useful tips on how to get into the fitness groove.

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    The GuardianThe Guardian

    Desperate to get fit but hate doing it in public? Here are seven ways to beat gymtimidation

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    Personal Growth6 min read
  6. TikTok's social shopping experience is proving to be a headache for Amazon's rather dull interface. This Bloomberg column looks at how Amazon is surprisingly bad at engaging young shoppers.

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    BloombergBloomberg

    TikTok’s coming for Amazon’s search traffic

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    Tech5 min read
  7. If you knew when you were going to die, how would you change the way you live? The Washington Post explores this idea and arguing that the depth of life, rather than the length, is what truly matters.

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    The Washington PostThe Washington Post

    If you could, would you want to know when you will die?

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    Health4 min read
  8. Two weeks ago, Alec Baldwin was charged with involuntary manslaughter after accidentally shooting cinematographer, Halyna Hutchins, on set. El Pais gives an overview of the entire story.

    Curated by informed
    El Pais

    Reconstructing the Baldwin case: How a bullet marked the career of one of Hollywood’s most famous actors

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    Culture4 min read

On a lighter note

  1. A restaurant owner in the U.S. unintentionally found herself enmeshed in the country's culture war. It's a peculiar story, and says a lot about America's political divide. The Washington Post reports.

    Curated by informed
    The Washington PostThe Washington Post

    When she named her breakfast cafe Woke, a conservative backlash followed

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    Politics2 min read
  2. Recently, four-year-old Teddy made headlines after becoming the UK's youngest member of Mensa. But what happens to such child geniuses when they are all grown up? The BBC answers this question.

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    BBC

    What happens when 'child geniuses' grow up

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    Culture5 min read

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