Explore/Science

Science

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    CNN

    Highlights from the total solar eclipse

    informed Summary

    1. The total solar eclipse that swept across Mexico, the U.S. and Canada has completed its journey over continental North America. The celestial spectacle was last seen along the Atlantic coast of Newfoundland, Canada, and first experienced in Mazatlan, Mexico.
    Science
    4 min read
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    Vox

    Are rainforests doomed? Not necessarily.

    informed Summary

    1. The planet lost 9.2 million acres of its tropical forest in 2023, equivalent to about 10 soccer fields of forest per minute for an entire year, according to data from the World Resources Institute and the University of Maryland. This loss has contributed to the extinction crisis and climate change.
    Science
    5 min read
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    Sky News

    Moon to get its own time zone created by NASA - but clocks work differently there

    informed Summary

    1. The White House has directed NASA to develop a unified lunar time standard, known as Coordinated Lunar Time (LTC), by the end of 2026. This will provide a time-keeping benchmark for lunar spacecraft and satellites.
    Science
    2 min read
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    TIME

    Why China could beat the U.S. back to the Moon

    informed Summary

    1. The U.S. and China are both planning to land astronauts on the Moon by 2030, with the U.S. aiming for 2026 or 2027 and China before 2030. The U.S. plans to land near the Shackleton Crater at the south lunar pole, where ice deposits can be harvested for water, oxygen and rocket fuel.
    Science
    7 min read
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    NPR

    Once lost to science, these 'uncharismatic' animals are having their moment

    informed Summary

    1. The rate at which animals species are becoming extinct is accelerating globally, with many considered "lost" after no trace of them is found for 10 years. These species are often threatened by human impacts such as climate change, pollution and the destruction of their natural habitat.
    Science
    5 min read
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    NPR

    Your muscles keep time too. How circadian rhythms affect your workout and your health

    informed Summary

    1. Circadian rhythms, the patterns in our physiology and behavior that fluctuate over a 24-hour cycle, play a significant role in determining the best time to exercise. While there is no scientific consensus, recent research suggests that exercise can help keep the body's circadian rhythms in sync, with morning or early afternoon workouts pushing rhythms towards an earlier schedule.
    Science
    7 min read
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    CNN

    Polar ice is melting and changing Earth’s rotation. It’s messing with time itself

    informed Summary

    1. A new study suggests that melting polar ice, influenced by human activity, is altering the Earth's rotation and changing time itself. This is because the hours and minutes that dictate our days are determined by Earth's rotation, which can change slightly depending on what's happening on the surface and in the planet's molten core.
    Science
    4 min read
  8. El Pais

    Why scientists are making transparent wood

    informed Summary

    1. Transparent wood, created by bleaching away the pigments in plant cells, could soon be used in super-strong screens for smartphones, light fixtures, and structural features like color-changing windows. The material is stronger than plastic and glass, and retains its wood grain, giving it a natural aesthetic.
    Science
    6 min read
  9. CNN

    Colorful paintings of daily life uncovered in 4,300-year-old Egyptian tomb

    informed Summary

    1. A tomb dating back more than 4,300 years has been discovered in the pyramid necropolis of Dahshur, south of Cairo, during an Egyptian-German archaeological mission. The tomb, known as a mastaba, features colorful paintings of daily life in ancient Egypt.
    Science
    2 min read
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    Vox

    Kate Middleton’s cancer diagnosis is part of a frightening global trend

    informed Summary

    1. Catherine, Princess of Wales -- also known as Kate Middleton -- announced in a video message that she was diagnosed with cancer after doctors discovered evidence of the disease during abdominal surgery earlier this year. The type and stage of the cancer have not been disclosed by Kensington Palace.
    Science
    3 min read
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    CBS

    The first day of spring in 2024 is a day earlier than typical years. Here's why

    informed Summary

    1. Spring is starting earlier than usual in 2024, with the vernal equinox marking the first day of spring on March 19, according to the U.S. National Weather Service. This is due to 2024 being a leap year.
    Science
    3 min read
  12. CNBC

    United Arab Emirates is using cloud seeding tech to make it rain

    informed Summary

    1. The Middle East is facing severe water scarcity due to rising global temperatures and climate change. The UAE, for example, averages less than 200 millimeters of rainfall a year and temperatures can reach as high as 50 degrees Celsius during the summer.
    Science
    3 min read
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    Vox

    Seventeen astounding scientific mysteries that researchers can’t yet solve

    informed Summary

    1. Vox's Unexplainable podcast explores unanswered scientific questions and the process of scientific discovery. The podcast emphasizes that scientific knowledge is always evolving and that the process of science involves narrowing the gap between our questions and our ability to answer them.
    Science
    14 min read
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    Vox

    Many coral reefs are dying. This one is exploding with life

    informed Summary

    1. A team of marine biologists witnessed a rare coral spawning event off the coast of Cambodia, in the Gulf of Thailand. The event was captured on video by the team, led by environmental group Fauna & Flora International.
    Science
    5 min read
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    Vox

    Are we breaking the Atlantic Ocean?

    informed Summary

    1. Global warming could potentially cause temperatures in some parts of the world to plummet, according to a paper in Science Advances. This could occur if enough ice melts into the North Atlantic, causing average temperatures in cities like Bergen, Norway, to drop 15 degrees Celsius. This would also trigger a climate tipping point, causing cascading effects around the world.
    Science
    7 min read
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    TIME

    The quiet work trees do for the planet

    informed Summary

    1. Urban trees aren't just aesthetic features, but are vital ecosystems that sustain life and play a crucial role in combating climate change. They capture carbon dioxide, manage stormwater and provide shade, reducing the urban heat island effect.
    Science
    4 min read
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    CNN

    I’m a climate scientist. If you knew what I know, you’d be terrified too

    informed Summary

    1. The world is experiencing a unique heating episode, with greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere seeing a precipitous hike. That is probably unprecedented in the last 4.6 billion years, according to Bill McGuire, professor emeritus of geophysical and climate hazards at University College London.
    Science
    4 min read
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    Vox

    Does climate change trigger earthquakes?

    informed Summary

    1. Vox recently asked its readers to sent the website questions and ideas that they would like it to explore. We've included some of the responses below.
    Science
    5 min read
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    CBS

    Could the Arctic be ice-free within a decade?

    informed Summary

    1. The Arctic could experience "summer days with practically no sea ice as early as the next couple of years," according to a new study from the University of Colorado Boulder. This could occur more than 10 years earlier than previous projections.
    Science
    2 min read
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    BBC

    Climate change is altering this Arctic language

    informed Summary

    1. The Sami languages, spoken by the indigenous Sami people in the Arctic regions of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia, are intricately tied to their traditional way of life, including activities such as fishing and reindeer herding. These languages have a highly specialized vocabulary, with more than 300 words for snow and multiple words for different types of reindeer and weather patterns.
    Science
    8 min read